Thursday, April 24, 2014

Day 10: Tiferet b’Gevurah

Day Three of Week 2 (10th day of Omer): Tiferet in Gevurah
by Susie Davidson

The aspects of Tiferet are harmony, compassion and mercy. "Tiferet is a blueprint for change, and how your plan for change takes into account the need for balance—both internally and with others.” (Chabad.org) In order for our desired change to manifest, we need reserves of Gevurah's discipline and careful planning. We need its restraint as well, so as to keep our plans attainable and effective. “How far and wide will the change be? When is the change best timed for? And do you need and have support?” It is about formulating your plan and putting your determination into actuality.

Tiferet is about the self-love and determination that help one to achieve and manifest our goals - and balance. These aspects can be most effectively combined with the restraint and discipline of Gevurah.

Agriculture certainly entails harmony in the layout of the rows of planting, the balance of crops, the melding of varied harvested foods. Each sheath of a grain is harmoniously designed. Agriculture requires compassionate, careful planning in order to treat the Earth with respect. Here, I recall the Torah-directed mitzvah of Shmita – letting our fields rest once every seven years. This aligns with the seven days of this week of the Omer.

With great discipline, and restrained, carefully-planned action, we can work the soil in a thoughtful manner to grow the barley and grains and all of the gifts of produce that will sustain and enrich our bodies and minds.

Action: Study biblical methods of farming, and contrast with modern machine-driven, pesticide-oriented agriculture. Think about or research ways by which we can improve these modern systems so as to reflect original methods of growing our food.

List hazardous by-products of modern agriculture, and suggest ways that they might be mitigated through other methods of production. How can we spread these ideas, perhaps through online petitions aimed at agricultural conglomerates and corporations?

No comments:

Post a Comment