Thursday, July 2, 2015

100 Fungi, Protists, and Monerans

by Rabbi Katy Z. Allen

We are part of complex ecosystems, and many of the organisms that live beside us and within us are foreign to us. They may be so small that we can't see them, or they may fill the oceans or the soil or the rivers and lakes and be essentially invisible to us. Yet, these organisms are critical parts of Creation. Kingdom Protista contains about 200,000 species, Kingdom Fungi contains about 5.1 million species, and Kingdom Monera contains about 10,000 species. That's a lot of diversity! How much awareness of it do we have? Chances are, very little.

Here's a small smattering of these three kingdoms, 100 of them, to be exact, with no guarantees of consistent scientific distinctions, a mix of scientific and common names, and with some options to view images or learn more.

                 1)      Amanita
2)      Ameba
3)      Aspergillus
4)      Bifidobacterium (bacteria)
5)      Black bread mold
6)      Black mold
7)      Blue-green mold
8)      Bolete mushroom
9)      Bracket fungus
10)  British soldiers lichen
11)  Brown algae
12)  Cellular slime mold
13)  Chanterelle mushroom
14)  Chara (stonewort)
15)  Chlamydomonas
16)  Choanoflagellate
17)  Chondrus (red algae)
18)  Ciliate
19)  Closterium
21)  Common greenshield lichen
22)  Crimini mushroom
23)  Cryptomonas
24)  Cyanobacteria
25)  Death cap mushroom
26)  Diatom
27)  Dictyota
28)  Didinium
29)  Dinoflagellate
30)  Downy mildew
32)  Euglena
33)  Ferroplasma 
34)  Foraminiferan
35)  Fucus
36)  Gelidium (red algae)
37)  Giant puffball
38)  Giardia 
39)  Golden algae
40)  Gracilaria
41)  Halophile
42)  Hen of the woods mushroom
44)  Indian pipe mushroom
45)  Ink cap mushroom
46)  Lactobacillus
47)  Laminaria (kelp)
48)  Lion's Mane Mushroom
49)  Macrocystis (kelp)
51)  Methanogen
52)  Microsporidium
53)  Morel
54)  Mycobacterium
55)  Nitrospira
56)  Nostoc
57)  Oedogonium
58)  Oyster mushroom
59)  Padina
60)  Paramecium
61)  Pediastrum
62)  Pelagophycus (kelp)
63)  Penicillium
64)  Plasmodium
66)  Polysiphonia
67)  Porphyra
68)  Portobello mushroom
69)  Powdery mildew
70)  Proterospongia
71)  Pseudolithophyllum (red algae)
72)  Rhizopus mold
73)  Rotifer
74)  Rust fungi
75)  Salmonella
76)  Sargassum
77)  Sargassum
78)  Shitake mushroom
79)  Slime mold
80)  Smut fungi
81)  Spirogyra
82)  Spirulina
84)  Stentor
85)  Streptococcus
86)  Thermophile
87)  Thermoplasma 
88)  Thermotoga
89)  Toxoplasma
90)  Tropical red algae
91)  Truffle
92)  Trypanosoma
93)  Ulothrix
94)  Ulva
95)  Veiled Lady Mushroom
96)  Volvox
97)  Vorticella
99)  Yeast
100)    Yersinia (bacterium)

Rabbi Katy Allen is a board certified chaplain and serves as a Nature Chaplain and the Facilitator of One Earth Collaborative, a program of Open Spirit. She is the founder and rabbi of Ma'yan Tikvah - A Wellspring of Hope, which holds services outdoors all year long. She is the President of the Boston-based Jewish Climate Action Network

No comments:

Post a Comment