Wednesday, February 4, 2015

Holding Ourselves into a New Future

by Rabbi Katy Z. Allen
[This article was first published at Eden Keeper. Links are to other Eden Keeper articles.]

Tragedies are the staple of our days. Black youth are murdered. Police officers are killed. Grocery stores are bombed. Shootings take place in malls and offices. Bombs are dropped on civilians. Superstorms devastate coastal areas. Cancer is rampant. Angry outbursts fill social media.

We hear daily about the impact or the potential impact of climate change: rising sea levels; more intense and frequent superstorms; drought; flooding; crop failure; food shortages; acidified oceans. The list goes on and on.

What does our future bring? Is the human species in danger? What will become of our planet?

Such questions are unanswerable, but hang in the air around us day in and day out. Amid these questions, we go about our daily lives. What else can we do? We must feed ourselves and our children. We must work to pay our rent or mortgage. We must do the many tasks of daily living – cooking, cleaning, shopping, laundering.

Our reality? We live, day in and day out, with huge amounts of background stress.

How do we hold ourselves into the uncertainty of our future? How do we live with the existential threat of climate change? How do we stay sane?

One explanation can be found in an exploration of the very process of living. The past is the past forever. Each and every instant of each and every day, the actions we take and the words we say move from the present into the past, and there they stay.

What do we want our past to look like? We have no control over the existing past, but we do have control of the past that is yet to be. With each and every action we take and word we speak, we create a “new” past.

In the stress that we hold daily in our lives, what emotional and spiritual tools assist us in being capable of acting in ways that are filled with wisdom and compassion and speaking with words of truth and love?

For each of us, developing the tools to both manage stresses and find meaning and joy is the personal journey of life. And a new role is developing in our world to help us find those tools. That role is a new kind of chaplain.

A chaplain is a trained clergy person or lay person with a theological background. We are familiar with hospital chaplains and prison chaplains and university chaplains. Each of these is defined by the location, generally a secular institution, in which the chaplain works. A hospital chaplain, for example, visits those who are ill or dying, or their family members. The chaplain provides a safe and empathetic ear to hear the patient’s story, however it is told, to hear it deeply and reflect it back through words or prayer or meditation. The hospital chaplain holds the pain and suffering of the patient and family by being a non-anxious presence in the room, unafraid to name the reality of death, knowledgeable about the kinds of fears patients may hold in their hearts, skilled at building relationships and helping people feel supported.

An Earth chaplain – or nature chaplain, Creation chaplain, or eco-chaplain – is also defined by his or her place of work, on Earth, in nature, in the Created world, in the ecosystems of our planet. In other words, just about anywhere. The role of Earth chaplains is yet to be developed and defined; the field and the options are wide open, but underlying the concept of the nature chaplain is the notion that systemically and institutionally, the societies and cultures we have built are harmful to our well-being, and as a result, we are gradually and inevitably destroying the very planet upon which we all depend. Our societies have caused us to become disconnected from the Earth out of which we evolved and to enter into despair and distress in response to that disconnection.

Knowingly or unknowingly, we yearn for better connections to all Creation and we can be healed by our connections to the Earth. 

Into this space of despair and fear steps the Earth chaplain, bringing a compassionate, listening presence, unafraid to name and hold our despair, our fear, our grief, able to provide the safe space we need to voice our emotions, to facilitate our collective re-connection to each other and to the rest of the natural world, of which we are a part. Into the abyss in which we find ourselves steps the Creation chaplain, steady and empathetic, ready to provide the connections between our religious and spiritual traditions, ourselves, and the Universe that can give us the strength we need to go forward, using the tools we already have so that we can journey to yet deeper levels of understanding of ourselves and our relationship with all that is.

The Earth is the workplace of the nature chaplain.

Each of us walks through life embedded in three kinds of sacred texts. One is the text of our lives, the stories we tell of ourselves and our families and friends. One is the texts of our tradition, whether religious texts or texts of some other canon of public knowledge, texts that may range from the Bible to the Koran to the Talmud to Thoreau to Winnie the Pooh to Mary Oliver. And one is the texts of the Earth and of the Universe – the trees, the rocks, the plants, the sky, the stars, the rippling stream, the waving fields of grasses, the jagged mountain peaks, the weed poking through the sidewalk – all that is living and nonliving beyond ourselves. And when we weave these three sacred texts of our lives together – unique for each of us, shared by all of us – we create a tapestry that is more powerful and more mysterious and more wondrous than any one of these texts alone.

Myriad are the texts of the Earth chaplain.

An Earth chaplain may take a group of people outdoors, in nearby parks, woods, or fields, and guide them in ways to be more present and aware of their natural surroundings, to connect, to hear, to see, to feel the Earth at depths they may not usually experience it. A nature chaplain may provide a safe space for people to share their stories and their grief about the losses they are experiencing in relation to the physical world. A Creation chaplain may provide a secure environment in which people can search out and identify ways to live in greater harmony with the Earth. A nature chaplain may create and lead rituals and prayers that strengthen connections to other human beings, to G!d, and to the Universe.
Still to be fully explored is the work of a Creation chaplain.

The search for new ways to hold ourselves into the future is an ancient one, with new dimensions. But no one needs to search alone, and nature chaplains can help in the exploration of this journey.

In Metrowest Boston, a community nature chaplaincy program is in its early stages of visioning and development. You are invited to join the exploration. Please contact us, or come to a public forum to help envision the role of the nature chaplain. Dates, times, and locations can be found at www.mayantikvah.org/nature-chaplaincy.

Please be in touch.

Rabbi Katy Z. Allen is the founder and leader of Ma’yan Tikvah – A Wellspring of Hope in WaylandMA, and a staff chaplain at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. She is the co-convener of the Jewish Climate Action Network, a member of the Jewcology.org editorial board, and a board member of Shomrei Bereishit: Rabbis and Cantors for the Earth.



Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Hanukkah 5775 - Night 8 Re-Dedication Meditation

by Rabbi Katy Z. Allen

On this last night of the Festival of Re-dedication, we light all eight candles, we complete the “Litany of Harm” and the “Call to Action,” and we add one last item to our list of promises to ourselves for the year to come.

Hanukkah Night 8:
The Litany of Harm:
For all those in island nations, where rising sea levels and superstorms threaten their very existence. We stand in witness!
For all coastal cities and villages, where storm swells and flooding put lives and homes at risk. We stand in witness!
For all those who suffer from tropical diseases, and those at risk from spreading diseases and heat waves. We stand in witness!
For farmers and all who eat, as droughts ruin crops, incomes, and food supplies. We stand in witness!
For people of color around the world, who are at risk from climate change and environmental injustice. We stand in witness!
For the human populations, plants, and animals who are losing or have lost access to enough fresh water. We stand in witness! 
For the countless animals who suffer in factory farms, in a system that causes misery and carbon pollution. We stand in witness!
For all the habitats already lost and which are disappearing. We stand in witness!*
For the endangered mammals, plants, birds, insects, and all the species we will never discover. We stand in witness! 
For the burning rain forests. We stand in witness!
For the warming oceans and the dying choral reefs. We stand in witness! 
For the mountaintops removed, water supplies poisoned, and oceans spilled with oil. We stand in witness!
For all who make their living from our addiction to fossil fuels.We stand in witness!
For our own roles in using and wasting energy. We stand in witness!
For all of us, and our children and their children, who are living and growing up on a changing Earth. We stand in witness! 
For the courage and strength it takes to face climate change with love and hope. We stand in witness!
The Call to Action:
We’re ready to act because we have a favorite place on Earth that we want our great-grandchildren to experience. With love in our hearts, Compassionate One, move us to action.
We’re ready to act because somewhere we heard John Muir’s voice, reminding us that in the beauty of nature we see the beginning of creation. With beauty in our hearts, Creator, move us to action.
We’re ready to act because someone in our life once shared something with us – something we needed; something we could not live without – and we want to do the same for the next generation and beyond. With generosity in our hearts, Holy One of Blessing, move us to action.
We’re ready to act because we've read texts we consider sacred, and they make clear that the Earth is a gift, and we are stewards of that gift. With responsibility in our hearts, G!d of Judgment, move us to action.
We’re ready to act  because the blessing of life has allowed us to see the ways our lives are all connected with one another in a web of mutuality. Affirming the web of life, Mysterious One, move us to action.  
We’re ready to act  because the most basic moral instruction at the core of every world religion is the call to love our neighbors as ourselves; ... and we regard future generations as no less our neighbors than those who live next door to us today.  Affirming all people alive – and yet to be born – as our neighbors, G!d of Life, move us to action.  
We’re ready to act  because we want to be part of the solution.  Affirming the gift of creativity, Almighty, move us to action.  
We’re ready to act  because the G!d of Many Names is a G!d of hope, and as people of hope, we will not stop until the people of the world embrace new habits, new practices and new aspirations that will extend to countless generations the bountiful creation into which we were born.  As people of hope, G!d of Many Names, move us to action.**
We add the last item to our list.

For this last night, we consider how we behave toward those around us. What can we do better in our individual relationships? Where are our weaknesses? Our strengths? What do we wish we could do better when we are interacting with family, friends, co-workers, neighbors, and others around us?

Here are my thoughts for this last night of Hanukkah: 
Eloheinu v’elohei avoteinu v’imoteinu, Our G!d and G!d of our ancestors, give me strength on this last night of Hanukkah, and help me to re-dedicate myself to remembering that I am created in the image of the Holy One of Blessing, to eating organic, local food, to speaking out about racism, to maintaining my values in my finances, to writing to my representatives or local paper about climate change and social justice issues, to supporting the hungry, to matching my words and actions to my beliefs and values, and to treating others as I wish to be treated. 
What does your complete list look like?

As you go forward through this year, I invite you to keep your list with you. When you are feeling in need of strength, recite the prayer you have created to ask G!d for help. When you are feeling on top of the world, recite it to remind yourself of the work you have to do. Reflect on your successes. Feel gratitude for what you have been able to do. Search for the strength to go ever deeper in bringing light and joy and goodness into the Universe, and making G!d's presence manifest in the world.

Hanukkah Sameach – Happy Hanukkah,
Rabbi Katy

* by Rabbi Shoshana Meira Friedman
** by Rev. Jim Antal, adapted


Monday, December 22, 2014

Hanukkah 5775 - Night 7 Re-Dedication Meditation

by Rabbi Katy Z. Allen

On this penultimate night of Hanukkah, we light seven candles, we continue the “Litany of Harm” and the “Call to Action,” and we consider a seventh way to strengthen our resolve to change the world in positive ways. 

Hanukkah Night 7:
The Litany of Harm:
For all those in island nations, where rising sea levels and superstorms threaten their very existence. We stand in witness!
For all coastal cities and villages, where storm swells and flooding put lives and homes at risk. We stand in witness!
For all those who suffer from tropical diseases, and those at risk from spreading diseases and heat waves. We stand in witness!
For farmers and all who eat, as droughts ruin crops, incomes, and food supplies. We stand in witness!
For people of color around the world, who are at risk from climate change and environmental injustice. We stand in witness!
For the human populations, plants, and animals who are losing or have lost access to enough fresh water. We stand in witness! 
For the countless animals who suffer in factory farms, in a system that causes misery and carbon pollution. We stand in witness!
For all the habitats already lost and which are disappearing. We stand in witness!*
For the endangered mammals, plants, birds, insects, and all the species we will never discover. We stand in witness! 
For the burning rain forests. We stand in witness!
For the warming oceans and the dying choral reefs. We stand in witness! 
For the mountaintops removed, water supplies poisoned, and oceans spilled with oil. We stand in witness!
For all who make their living from our addiction to fossil fuels.We stand in witness!
For our own roles in using and wasting energy. We stand in witness!
The Call to Action:
We’re ready to act because we have a favorite place on Earth that we want our great-grandchildren to experience. With love in our hearts, Compassionate One, move us to action.
We’re ready to act because somewhere we heard John Muir’s voice, reminding us that in the beauty of nature we see the beginning of creation. With beauty in our hearts, Creator, move us to action.
We’re ready to act because someone in our life once shared something with us – something we needed; something we could not live without – and we want to do the same for the next generation and beyond. With generosity in our hearts, Holy One of Blessing, move us to action.
We’re ready to act because we've read texts we consider sacred, and they make clear that the Earth is a gift, and we are stewards of that gift. With responsibility in our hearts, G!d of Judgment, move us to action.
We’re ready to act  because the blessing of life has allowed us to see the ways our lives are all connected with one another in a web of mutuality. Affirming the web of life, Mysterious One, move us to action.  
We’re ready to act  because the most basic moral instruction at the core of every world religion is the call to love our neighbors as ourselves; ... and we regard future generations as no less our neighbors than those who live next door to us today.  Affirming all people alive – and yet to be born – as our neighbors, G!d of Life, move us to action.  
We’re ready to act  because we want to be part of the solution.  Affirming the gift of creativity, Almighty, move us to action. 
We add a seventh item to our efforts toward re-dedication.

For the seventh night, we consider our integrity. Do our actions match our words? Do our words mirror our deeply-held beliefs? Do we say and do what we know is right? What can we do to ensure that the answers to these questions are YES as much of the time as possible?

Here is how my list is shaping up on this seventh night of Hanukkah: 
Eloheinu v’elohei avoteinu v’imoteinu, Our G!d and G!d of our ancestors, give me strength on this seventh night of Hanukkah, and help me to re-dedicate myself to remembering that I am created in the image of the Holy One of Blessing, to eating organic, local food, to speaking out about racism, to maintaining my values in my finances, to writing to my representatives or local paper about climate change and social justice issues, to supporting the hungry, and to matching my words and actions to my beliefs and values. 
What are you adding to your list tonight?

Chag Urim Sameach – Happy Hanukkah,
Rabbi Katy

* by Rabbi Shoshana Meira Friedman
** by Rev. Jim Antal, adapted

Sunday, December 21, 2014

Hanukkah 5775 - Night 6 Re-Dedication Meditation

by Rabbi Katy Z. Allen

Tonight we light six candles, the lights in our home grow ever brighter, but as we add to the “Litany of Harm,” we know that there is darkness in many corners of the world, and so we add also to our “Call to Action,” and consider a sixth way to move our lives forward in a way that adds light to the world.

Hanukkah Night 6:
The Litany of Harm:
For all those in island nations, where rising sea levels and superstorms threaten their very existence. We stand in witness!
For all coastal cities and villages, where storm swells and flooding put lives and homes at risk. We stand in witness!
For all those who suffer from tropical diseases, and those at risk from spreading diseases and heat waves. We stand in witness!
For farmers and all who eat, as droughts ruin crops, incomes, and food supplies. We stand in witness!
For people of color around the world, who are at risk from climate change and environmental injustice. We stand in witness!
For the human populations, plants, and animals who are losing or have lost access to enough fresh water. We stand in witness! 
For the countless animals who suffer in factory farms, in a system that causes misery and carbon pollution. We stand in witness!
For all the habitats already lost and which are disappearing. We stand in witness!*
For the endangered mammals, plants, birds, insects, and all the species we will never discover. We stand in witness! 
For the burning rain forests. We stand in witness!
For the warming oceans and the dying choral reefs. We stand in witness! 
For the mountaintops removed, water supplies poisoned, and oceans spilled with oil. We stand in witness!
The Call to Action:
We’re ready to act because we have a favorite place on Earth that we want our great-grandchildren to experience. With love in our hearts, Compassionate One, move us to action.
We’re ready to act because somewhere we heard John Muir’s voice, reminding us that in the beauty of nature we see the beginning of creation. With beauty in our hearts, Creator, move us to action.
We’re ready to act because someone in our life once shared something with us – something we needed; something we could not live without – and we want to do the same for the next generation and beyond. With generosity in our hearts, Holy One of Blessing, move us to action.
We’re ready to act because we've read texts we consider sacred, and they make clear that the Earth is a gift, and we are stewards of that gift. With responsibility in our hearts, G!d of Judgment, move us to action.
We’re ready to act  because the blessing of life has allowed us to see the ways our lives are all connected with one another in a web of mutuality. Affirming the web of life, Mysterious One, move us to action.  
We’re ready to act  because the most basic moral instruction at the core of every world religion is the call to love our neighbors as ourselves; ... and we regard future generations as no less our neighbors than those who live next door to us today.  Affirming all people alive – and yet to be born – as our neighbors, G!d of Life, move us to action. **
We add a sixth action to our commitment to ourselves.

For the sixth night, we consider our neighbors, those in our own communities and those around the world, who are mired in poverty, who go to bed hungry at night, and whose children die of starvation. What can we do to help them? How are we able to assist one person, a family, or a community? What are we able to give, financially or through our talents and skills, to change the plight of those with little or nothing?

Here are my commitments on this sixth night of Hanukkah: 
Eloheinu v’elohei avoteinu v’imoteinu, Our G!d and G!d of our ancestors, give me strength on this third night of Hanukkah, and help me to re-dedicate myself to remembering that I am created in the image of the Holy One of Blessing, to eating organic, local food, to speaking out about racism, to maintaining my values in my finances, to writing to my representatives or local paper about climate change and social justice issues, and to supporting the hungry. 
How is your list shaping up?

Chag Urim Sameach – Happy Hanukkah,
Rabbi Katy

* by Rabbi Shoshana Meira Friedman
** by Rev. Jim Antal, adapted

Friday, December 19, 2014

Hanukkah 5775 - Night 5 Re-Dedication Meditation

by Rabbi Katy Z. Allen

As we light five candles tonight, we continue the “Litany of Harm” and the “Call to Action,” and name for ourselves a fifth way to re-dedicate ourselves to walking in G!d's footsteps.

Hanukkah Night 5:
The Litany of Harm:
For all those in island nations, where rising sea levels and superstorms threaten their very existence. We stand in witness!
For all coastal cities and villages, where storm swells and flooding put lives and homes at risk. We stand in witness!
For all those who suffer from tropical diseases, and those at risk from spreading diseases and heat waves. We stand in witness!
For farmers and all who eat, as droughts ruin crops, incomes, and food supplies. We stand in witness!
For people of color around the world, who are at risk from climate change and environmental injustice. We stand in witness!
For the human populations, plants, and animals who are losing or have lost access to enough fresh water. We stand in witness! 
For the countless animals who suffer in factory farms, in a system that causes misery and carbon pollution. We stand in witness!
For all the habitats already lost and which are disappearing. We stand in witness!
For the endangered mammals, plants, birds, insects, and all the species we will never discover. We stand in witness! 
For the burning rain forests. We stand in witness!*
The Call to Action:
We’re ready to act because we have a favorite place on Earth that we want our great-grandchildren to experience. With love in our hearts, Compassionate One, move us to action.
We’re ready to act because somewhere we heard John Muir’s voice, reminding us that in the beauty of nature we see the beginning of creation. With beauty in our hearts, Creator, move us to action.
We’re ready to act because someone in our life once shared something with us – something we needed; something we could not live without – and we want to do the same for the next generation and beyond. With generosity in our hearts, Holy One of Blessing, move us to action.
We’re ready to act because we've read texts we consider sacred, and they make clear that the Earth is a gift, and we are stewards of that gift. With responsibility in our hearts, G!d of Judgment, move us to action.
We’re ready to act  because the blessing of life has allowed us to see the ways our lives are all connected with one another in a web of mutuality. Affirming the web of life, Mysterious One, move us to action. **
We add a fifth promise to the world:

For the fifth night, we consider our climate change advocacy. The climate is changing. Our governments acknowledge its reality through programs such as the regional USDA hubs designed to help farmers deal with the impact of climate change on agriculture. Our Congress is not yet willing to take action. Some state governments are starting to take matters into their hands, yet their efforts are slow and not enough. What can you do to try to influence public policy on climate and other environmental issues? Letter writing? Phone calls? Meetings? What would work best for you?

My reflections for the fifth night of Hanukkah include these committments: 
Eloheinu v’elohei avoteinu v’imoteinu, Our G!d and G!d of our ancestors, give me strength on this fifth night of Hanukkah, and help me to re-dedicate myself to remembering that I am created in the image of the Holy One of Blessing, to eating organic, local food, to speaking out about racism, to maintaining my values in my finances, and to writing to my representatives or local paper about climate change and social justice issues. 
To what are you re-dedicating yourself tonight?

Chag Urim Sameach – Happy Hanukkah,
Rabbi Katy

* by Rabbi Shoshana Meira Friedman
** by Rev. Jim Antal

Hanukkah 5775 - Night 4 Re-Dedication Meditation

by Rabbi Katy Z. Allen

On this fourth night, half way through Hanukkah, we light four candles, continue the “Litany of Harm” and the “Call to Action,” and consider a fourth way to move our lives forward in a way that adds goodness to the world.

Hanukkah Night 4:
The Litany of Harm:
For all those in island nations, where rising sea levels and superstorms threaten their very existence. We stand in witness!
For all coastal cities and villages, where storm swells and flooding put lives and homes at risk. We stand in witness!
For all those who suffer from tropical diseases, and those at risk from spreading diseases and heat waves. We stand in witness!
For farmers and all who eat, as droughts ruin crops, incomes, and food supplies. We stand in witness!
For people of color around the world, who are at risk from climate change and environmental injustice. We stand in witness!
For the human populations, plants, and animals who are losing or have lost access to enough fresh water. We stand in witness! 
For the countless animals who suffer in factory farms, in a system that causes misery and carbon pollution. We stand in witness!
For all the habitats already lost and which are disappearing. We stand in witness!*
The Call to Action:
We’re ready to act because we have a favorite place on Earth that we want our great-grandchildren to experience. With love in our hearts, Compassionate One, move us to action.
We’re ready to act because somewhere we heard John Muir’s voice, reminding us that in the beauty of nature we see the beginning of creation. With beauty in our hearts, Creator, move us to action.
We’re ready to act because someone in our life once shared something with us – something we needed; something we could not live without – and we want to do the same for the next generation and beyond. With generosity in our hearts, Holy One of Blessing, move us to action.
We’re ready to act because we've read texts we consider sacred, and they make clear that the Earth is a gift, and we are stewards of that gift. With responsibility in our hearts, G!d of Judgment, move us to action.**
We add a fourth promise to ourselves.

For the fourth night, we consider our finances. Where do you spend your money and how? What does the cost of an item say about the wages of the people who made it? What resources went into making it? If you have money invested, do you know how it is being used? How does your bank use your money? Are the ways your money is invested consistent with your values? (Click here for some resources with changes you might make.)

Here are my thoughts for this fourth night of Hanukkah: 
Eloheinu v’elohei avoteinu v’imoteinu, Our G!d and G!d of our ancestors, give me strength on this fourth night of Hanukkah, and help me to re-dedicate myself to remembering that I am created in the image of the Holy One of Blessing, to eating organic, local food, to speaking out about racism, and to maintaining my values in my finances.
What do you feel moved to add to your list tonight?

Chag Urim Sameach – Happy Hanukkah,
Rabbi Katy

* by Rabbi Shoshana Meira Friedman
** by Rev. Jim Antal

Thursday, December 18, 2014

Hanukkah 5775 - Night 3 Re-Dedication Meditation

by Rabbi Katy Z. Allen

On this third night of Hanukkah, we light three candles and continue to add to the “Litany of Harm” and the “Call to Action,” and we provide a third action to our personal list of ways in which to increase the sanctity of our lives and the lives of those around us.

Hanukkah Night 3:
We continue the Litany of Harm:
For all those in island nations, where rising sea levels and superstorms threaten their very existence. We stand in witness!
For all coastal cities and villages, where storm swells and flooding put lives and homes at risk. We stand in witness!
For all those who suffer from tropical diseases, and those at risk from spreading diseases and heat waves. We stand in witness!
For farmers and all who eat, as droughts ruin crops, incomes, and food supplies. We stand in witness!
For people of color around the world, who are at risk from climate change and environmental injustice. We stand in witness!
For the human populations, plants, and animals who are losing or have lost access to enough fresh water. We stand in witness! *
We continue our Call to Action:
We’re ready to act because we have a favorite place on earth that we want our great-grandchildren to experience. With love in our hearts, Compassionate One, move us to action.
We’re ready to act because somewhere we heard John Muir’s voice, reminding us that in the beauty of nature we see the beginning of creation. With beauty in our hearts, Creator, move us to action.
We’re ready to act because someone in our life once shared something with us – something we needed; something we could not live without – and we want to do the same for the next generation and beyond. With generosity in our hearts, Holy One of Blessing, move us to action.””
And we add a third item for increasing holiness.

For the third night, we focus on our responses to people of color. Do we see the differences in how white people and people of color are treated? Do we see how our days are different from those who are different from ourselves? Are we ready and able to recognize and acknowledge our white privilege? And what do we do about all of this?

Here are my thoughts for this third night of Hanukkah: 
Eloheinu v’elohei avoteinu v’imoteinu, Our G!d and G!d of our ancestors, give me strength on this third night of Hanukkah, and help me to re-dedicate myself to remembering that I am created in the image of the Holy One of Blessing, to eating organic, local food, and to speaking out about racism.
What do you feel moved to add to your list tonight?

Chag Urim Sameach – Happy Hanukkah,
Rabbi Katy

* by Rabbi Shoshana Meira Friedman
** by Rev. Jim Antal